Please Download the latest version of Adobe Flash Player.

 
 
   

Types of Pain and Problems

 

Head and Neck

Cervical Whiplash Injury

Cervical whiplash is an acute sprain or strain to the neck that occurs when one’s head is forced in a forward and/or backward motion without direct application of that force. For example, many cervical whiplash injuries may be caused by car accidents, falls, roller coasters, physical abuse (e.g. being punched or shaken) and certain contact sports. More information >

Chiari I Malformation

Chiari I Malformation is a pathological condition that can be diagnosed using an MRI. With Chiari I malformation, the cerebellum lays lower in the skull than normal; which in turn, pushes the brainstem down as well. The cerebellum is the part of the brain that is located at the base of the brain and on top of the brain stem. More information >

Eagle’s Syndrome

Eagle’s syndrome is an uncommon disorder in which patients may complain of facial and/or neck pain and/or numbness, constant sore throat, constant ear pain, or a constant sensation that something is “tickling your throat”. This is caused when there is an elongation of the styloid process of the temporal bone. More information >

Facet Syndrome

Pain from facet syndrome is usually caused by a sudden movement which causes trauma to the facet joint. One primary example is whiplash. In some cases the pain is chronic, due to long term degenerative disc changes. More information >

Failed Back/Neck Surgery Syndrome

Failed back surgery is not a syndrome, but rather it is the continuation of pain after spine or back surgery. People usually have spine surgery for two reasons. More information >

Myofascial Pain/Fibromyalgia

This is a chronic pain syndrome that involves the muscles and soft tissues in the face. Patients can have symptoms of trigger points and taut bands in the facial region. Trigger points are sites where muscles or tendons produce pain when pressed on. More information >

Neck Pain

The majority of people in the United States will suffer from neck pain at some time in their life. Neck pain has many different causes. The pain may be felt in the neck or can radiate into the shoulder and/or arm. Among the top causes of neck pain are arthritis, stenosis, disc herniation, stress, posture and most commonly, overuse. More information >

Headaches/Migraines

Migraine is a very broad term to which there are whole textbooks dedicated to teaching about migraines. In general, migraines are severe headache-type pains. There are many different types and causes to migraines. More information >

Post Concussion Syndrome

A concussion is trauma to the brain that does not necessarily require loss of consciousness. This condition is not life threatening. There are multiple causes of concussion: sports, car accidents, falls, etc. Sometimes, patients suffer from symptoms of headaches and dizziness a few days after the concussion that can last for months afterwards. More information >

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome consists of motor paralysis, facial palsy, and vertigo secondary to infection. This usually occurs after an infection with Herpes Zoster. This infection gets re-activated and can affect the facial nerve. Other symptoms include a painful, blister-like rash on ears and inside the throat, difficulty hearing, difficulty with balance, and ear pain. More information >

TMJ Pain (Temporo-mandibular Joint)

The TMJ (temporo-mandibular joint) is the jaw joint. TMJ pain has many causes that can affect the jaw itself, the joint, and/or the surrounding muscles and tissues. Common causes of TMJ pain are trauma, arthritis, teeth clenching, dental disease, and stress. More information >

Arms & Hands

Anterior Inter-osseous Syndrome (aka Kiloh-Nevin Syndrome)

Anterior Inter-osseous Syndrome is when there is weakness or pain that occurs in the index and middle fingers and forearm. This results when the anterior inter-osseous nerve, a large nerve that branches off from the median nerve, is trapped in its surroundings. More information >

Brachial or Lumbar Plexopathy

Brachial Plexopathy occurs when the brachial plexus is damaged or placed under pressure. The brachial plexus is a bundle of nerves that come from the spinal cord and supply the arm. More information >

Carpel Tunnel Syndrome (CTS)

Carpel Tunnel Syndrome is characterized by pain, tingling, numbness, and/or weakness in the thumb, index finger, and middle finger. Some patients experience a sensation of “pins and needles” in the affected hand. This syndrome occurs when the median nerve, a major nerve that runs the length of your forearm, is trapped by its surroundings. To determine if you are suffering from carpal tunnel syndrome, your health care provider will conduct a thorough examination to try and re-create the sensation you experience by tapping on the nerve. More information >

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome

Cubital Tunnel Syndrome is pain, tingling, numbness, and weakness that occurs in the ring finger, pinky, and inner portions of the hand (if palm is facing up) and may extend to inside of arm to the elbow. This results from the compression of the ulnar nerve, a major nerve that runs the length of the forearm. The sensation that one experiences when you “hit your funny bone” actually results from hitting the ulnar nerve that runs near the bone. More information >

Peripheral Neuropathy/Nerve Damage

Peripheral neuropathy is a numbness or weakness that affects the extremities, most often the hands and feet. It causes tingling and/or burning, most often described as a “pins & needles” sensation. It is also caused by damage to the nerves. While the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy is diabetes it can also be a result of trauma, infection or toxin exposure. More information >

Phantom Limb/Amputation Pain

This describes pain that occurs after amputation of any body part, in particular a limb. It most often occurs with the loss of a limb such as an arm or leg, but patients may experience phantom pain after procedures such as mastectomy or tooth extraction. Reasons for this pain are not well known. Some suggest that it is the body’s sensory “memory” in that particular area of the body that is involved. More information >

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

Thoracic Outlet Syndrome occurs when there is compression of the group of nerves, arteries, and veins that cross the first rib and enter the arm. A cervical rib may cause this compression. However, compression may also be caused by the scalenus muscle (one of three neck muscles) or by fibrous bands. Symptoms usually include pain that is felt in the forearm and is increased with movement of the arm or my raising the arm. More information >

Legs & Feet

Metatarsalgia

This is when one has pain at the ball of the foot that is caused by inflammation. This inflammation irritates the nerve roots that run along the ball of the foot. This area contains the joints of the foot called metatarsophalangeal joints. More information >

Peripheral Neuropathy/Nerve Damage

Peripheral neuropathy is a numbness or weakness that affects the extremities, most often the hands and feet. It causes tingling and/or burning, most often described as a “pins & needles” sensation. It is also caused by damage to the nerves. While the most common cause of peripheral neuropathy is diabetes it can also be a result of trauma, infection or toxin exposure. More information >

Phantom Limb/Amputation Pain

This describes pain that occurs after amputation of any body part, in particular a limb. It most often occurs with the loss of a limb such as an arm or leg, but patients may experience phantom pain after procedures such as mastectomy or tooth extraction. Reasons for this pain are not well known. Some suggest that it is the body’s sensory “memory” in that particular area of the body that is involved. More information >

SI Joint Dysfunction

SI Joint dysfunction is more often than not confused with Sciatica. It may mimic sciatica but it is a different problem entirely. SI joint dysfunction is pain in the sacroiliac joint located at the base of the spine where it interconnects with the pelvis. Everyone has two SI Joints, one on each side of the sacrum. The two most common problems are hyper-mobility (too loose) and hypo-mobility (stuck or unmoving). More information >

Sciatica/Herniated Disc

Sciatica is a term that describes a set of symptoms which include pain, numbness, weakness and tingling in a lower extremity. Most often only one side of the body is affected. Although this pain is commonly referred to as sciatica, it is important to understand that the term sciatica only describes the symptoms, rather than the cause. It is difficult to differentiate the two because the treatment varies depending on the underlying cause. More information >

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome is pain, tingling, numbness, and/or weakness that occur to the inside of the ankle to the toes and /or to the bottom of the foot. This is caused by compression of the posterior tibial nerve, a nerve that runs from the inside of ankle to the toes. More information >

Chest

CAD/Refractory Angina/Cardiac Pain

Refractory angina is a debilitating type of angina (chest pain) which does not respond to medication. Angina (chest pain) is the result of plaques in arteries which slow the blood flow and oxygen (which is transported via the blood) leaving the heart muscle deprived of oxygen-rich blood. More information >

Cancer/Visceral/Abdominal Pain

If the source of the pain cannot be removed (i.e. tumors) there are other methods to treat the pain. Most often, oral medications are used. Depending on the severity of the pain, your health care provider may prescribe medications to help alleviate your pain.  More information >

Devil’s Grip

This disease has many names: Bornholm Disease, Epidemic Pluerodynia, Bamble Disease, Epidemic Myalgia, and Epidemic Diaphragmatic Pleurodynia. The main symptom is pain in the lower chest or upper abdomen. Patients who suffer from Devil’s grip also experience severe headaches, fevers, and disturbances in their reflexes. More information >

Herpes Zoster

Herpes zoster is more commonly referred to as shingles, which is caused by herpes virus. It usually occurs in adults. The initial symptoms include pain, tingling, or numbness that is localized in dermatomes (an area of skin that is supplied by specific nerves). After these symptoms occur, a rash develops along the affected dermatomes. More information >

PHN/Post-Herpatic Neuralgia

Post-Herpatic Neuralgia is pain that occurs after an acute herpes zoster infection. Once an individual contracts herpes zoster, the virus has the ability to remain dormant within the body’s nerve roots. It can reappear at a later time causing inflammation to the nerves of the body. More information >

Thoracotomy Pain/Intercostal Neuralgia

Thoracotomy is a surgical incision into the pleural space of the chest. It is considered major surgery. Unfortunately, most post thoracotomy patients experience pain. This pain is difficult to deal with and often causes additional postoperative complications, such as pneumonia. It is very difficult to treat and is often attributed to rib pain from the rib spreader, nerve injuries from surgical trauma, and compression neuropathy of the intercostal nerves due to direct compression of the intercostal nerves by retractors. More information >

Back

Brachial or Lumbar Plexopathy

Brachial Plexopathy occurs when the brachial plexus is damaged or placed under pressure. The brachial plexus is a bundle of nerves that come from the spinal cord and supply the arm. More information >

Facet Syndrome

Pain from facet syndrome is usually caused by a sudden movement which causes trauma to the facet joint. One primary example is whiplash. In some cases the pain is chronic, due to long term degenerative disc changes. More information >

Failed Back/Neck Surgery Syndrome

Failed back surgery is not a syndrome, but rather it is the continuation of pain after spine or back surgery. People usually have spine surgery for two reasons. More information >

Vertebral/Spinal Fracture Pain

A fracture of the spine is a serious injury. Fractures most often occur in the thoracic and lumbar spine and men are more prone than woman. Fractures are usually caused by trauma, most often car accidents and falls. Older people are more at risk because of bone weakening due to osteoporosis. They will often experience a compression fracture, without any trauma involved. The most commonly reported symptoms of spinal fracture is pain. More information >

Low Back Pain

Low back pain is one of the most common back disorders. It is also the most common cause of work related disability claims in the United States. Fortunately most symptoms of low back pain only require conservative treatment because it is usually musculoskeletal in origin and is related to muscle sprain or strain. More information >

Spinal Cord Injury Pain

A spinal cord injury can occur anywhere down the spine, except below the L1 vertebrae. Aside from the acute pain that may occur after injury, some people can develop chronic pain. If a lesion occurs somewhere on the spinal cord, it can lead to what is called “central pain”. This damages the sensory pathways that run up and down the spine which normally allow communication to occur from the brain to the rest of the body. More information >

Syringomyelia

Syringomyelia is an abnormal cavity within the spinal cord. This cavity is usually filled with fluid. Unfortunately, this cavity causes the spine to not be straight and can sometimes be misdiagnosed as scoliosis. Often, patients are seen with a curvature of the spine to the right or left in the mid-back area. This can be diagnosed with a thorough physical examination and confirmed with an MRI study. More information >

Pelvis

Pelvic Pain/Coccydynia

Coccydynia is pain in the coccyx or as it is better known tailbone. The two most common causes are falling backwards and childbirth. However, in about one third of the cases the cause of coccydynia is unknown. The most common complaint is pain while sitting down, which is caused by the coccyx dislocating as you sit. More information >

Proctalgia Fugax

This is severe and sudden pain in the ano-rectal area. It seems like a spasm that may last anywhere from a few seconds to several minutes. Patients may experience this sensation a few times a year and it may come in episodes. Patients typically have no symptoms or issues in between episodes. More information >

Prostatodynia

Prostatodynia is characterized by symptoms of prostatic inflammation without the actual inflammation or infection. Prostatitis is the inflammation of the prostate gland that is usually caused by bacteria. Symptoms include pain and discomfort in pelvic area, problems urinating such as disrupted flow, hesitancy, postvoid dribbling, and decreased flow. More information >

Miscellaneous